Cosplay at the 2017 Geneva Gaming Convention

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I’ve been looking forward to the Geneva Gaming Convention for a very long time. In happy anticipation, I drive down to Palexpo. I’m in heaven. Surrounded by hundreds of gamers, all there to celebrate their love for games. I particularly enjoy the retro corner. I grew up with many of these games. GoldenEye! Street Fighter! But, my favourite thing this year? Cosplayers!

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In case you missed it: Cosplay (costume play) is a rapidly growing hobby-verging-on-culture in which the participants dress as specific characters from films, games, cartoons or books.

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Cosplay has multiple long roots that can be traced to the carnival dress of the 15th century, the costume balls of the 19th century and the “fancy dress parties” that were in vogue at the beginning of the 20th century.

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The first big leap was when attendees at 1930s science fiction conventions increasingly turned up in a pertinent costume. As a hobby unrelated to a specific event, it began to boom in 1980s Japan. No surprise there!

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Now, cosplay is much more than a costume ball writ large. It is globally connected being fuelled by social media, dedicated websites and specialised conventions. A hijab wearing Captain America even made the BBC news!

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There are cosplay competitions too. Cosplayers are judged on: resemblance to the original character in terms of appearance; quality and details of the costume and props; character portrayal and performance; stage presence and connection with the audience.

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An undercurrent of cosplay is based on sex appeal – by choosing a particularly alluring character – and changing gender (crossplayers!) This, unsurprisingly in today’s non-fantasy, pc world has precipitated fierce debate about what is and what is not appropriate.

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I’m a role-playing, hack-n-slash kinda guy, but I’ve never quite had the nerve to dress up as a character from a film, game or cartoon. I’ve always admired those that did. They really throw themselves into it.

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What is it about dressing up as a fantasy personage? I admit, it kind of appeals. Maybe next time. Maybe in a Vault 13 jumpsuit. Yea!

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A Sudden Death

That awful unexpected phone call. He’s dead. Your world kind of crumples. Incomprehension. Nausea. Anger. Family members converge from all over; they hang on each other’s necks and sob. Fast forward three weeks. Boat-scattered ashes and roses intermingle on the surface of a river with two hundred friends and relatives cheering. A fitting send-off for this big-hearted husband, brother, father and friend loved and admired in equal measure. Poignant, almost joyful, beautiful stuff.

Bruce

Do not believe that your sudden death or a sudden death in your family is not in the deck of cards from which fate is dealing your hand. For your family’s sake, think now about the possibility of your sudden death. Have you written a will? Where is it? If it is not obvious, who is your formal next-of-kin? And if that person is indisposed, who might stand in? Make sure someone knows what you want done. Do you want to be an organ donor? Do you want to be buried or cremated? Do you want a religious or non-religious ceremony? Where will the grave be or the ashes scattered? Is there a charity you would like to support as an alternative to people paying for flowers or gifts? It is surprisingly important for your family to know what kind of music you would want played.

All your paperwork will be required by your family. Can someone else find your bank accounts, insurance policies, birth and marriage certificates, passport, national health card, your doctor’s name and address, national insurance number, mobile phone provider, your address book and many more. Accounts have to be accessed and closed. Make sure that passwords can be retrieved. I cannot stress this enough, make sure passwords can be retrieved.

And so to the family. You will find yourselves having to function practically in new emotional territory precisely when you are all in emotional turmoil. You will face a mountain of tasks. First, how do you tell everyone who has to be told? There is an outgoing phase of painful telephone calls, emails and facebook messages. Be prepared for the incoming phase from distressed family, friends, former colleagues, old school pals, team mates etc. Be prepared for people calling round throughout the day. Be prepared for their emotions. Be prepared for his mobile phone ringing. Be prepared for bizarre comments (such as a suggestion that the grieving wife might find solace in on-line dating!) Be prepared for more flowers than the house’s vases can accommodate. Be prepared for bundles of cards ranging from the touching, to the cute and even the distasteful. Be prepared for more cakes, casseroles and home-made biscuits than you all can possibly eat. Be prepared to be bowled over by peoples’ kindness. Be prepared to hear so many times “If there’s anything at all that we can do…” Just smile and say “Thank you.” Throughout all this, you will find steel friends.

Seemingly small practicalities kick in hard. Did he pay the car insurance that was due? Didn’t he have a dental appointment this week? Should we inform the police that there is no longer anyone with a shotgun certificate for the shotgun in the safe upstairs?

And there is more. Much, much, more. Be prepared, in parallel and from the first day, for the legal and administrative matters relating to a sudden death. This – in the UK – involves the police, a funeral director, the coroner’s office and the registrar of births, deaths & marriages. The procedures and papers to be completed are different from those of an expected death. For example, there is no medical certification of death. A heavyweight moment for everyone is the formal next of kin being informed of the cause of death. This precipitates another wave of outgoing messages to those who said they wanted to know.

The officials you deal with in person or by phone can be caring and sympathetic or they can be infuriatingly incompetent and rude. All is set to test your self-control. For any meeting or signing, carry all his official documents and carry all your official documents and proof of address. Make sure you have cash and that credit card payment will not be rejected. Certificates and services such as cremation have to be paid for up front. See your bank manager as early as possible. Probate, life insurance, pensions and savings have to be taken in hand. You will find on-line how to inform different government agencies such as those responsible for driving licence, tax, passport, health care etc.

In the first two weeks, one person should be the point of contact for and coordinate all this on behalf of the family. At all costs, avoid misunderstandings and confusion. Buy a book to write everything in. Record all contacts, meetings, telephone numbers and decisions. Encourage everyone to write any new contacts, suggestions or developments in it. Have a “team meeting” each day initially. Opinions differ. Listen to others. Be flexible. Cry together. Hug.

A reality creeps up on you and sinks its claws in. There are “arrangements” to be made. This is where your time and energies are expended. The funeral director needs to discuss burial versus cremation, choice of casket, flowers, the urn for ashes and what kind of event is being planned (we went for and recommend a humanist ceremony), where and when. Ask questions. Say what you want. Be firm. And then… Do you want to view your dead husband, brother, father? What clothes is he going to wear? This stressful stuff comes with short deadlines, a need for rapid decisions and long daily to-do lists.

Discussions and decisions increasingly focus on the event that symbolises public grieving: the cremation, memorial service, the funeral, the wake, the scattering of ashes or combinations thereof. Its organisation by necessity starts early. Get it right. I repeat, get it right. This is so important for you. Do not leave things for tomorrow that can be done today. The team meetings really help. Share the tasks. Here’s a checklist: What would he want? What do you want? Where and when? Who will be in charge of the ceremenony? Will that person be religious, civil or humanist? (The funeral director will have people on their books. Meet them beforehand.) How do you announce the event whether to individuals, collectively and publicly? (We found social media very useful. The funeral director can organse a local press announcement) How long will the event last? Critically, how will it end? Who will write the eulogies? Who will read the eulogies? (Gulp!) Who will read what poems? What about songs? What is your estimate of how many people will come? Decisions have to be made about orders of service, flowers, food, drinks, music. How can guests contribute to the chosen charity? Visit the event location well beforehand. Develop a working relationship with whomever is in charge. Check the seating. Check the sound system and microphones. Who will cue the music? Will guests be asked to place a photo or object on a memory table? Will they write in a book? If ashes are to be scattered, where will this be, when and will this be in the presence of other mourners? Do you have permission to scatter them there? Avoid surprises.

A great send-off is a great part of healthy grieving. It really is possible to organise it in those difficult early days. Doing so brings the family together. So line it all up. Take a big breath in and let the show begin. Be ready for unexpected guests and expected gusts not coming. Be ready for tears. Lots of tears. Your tears, your familys’ tears and the tears of others. Tears are great ! Let it all out and you will feel, for the first time since the phone call, that maybe there is still a glimmer of sun behind that big, black, heavy storm cloud.

Print this out. Keep it safely. If you need it one day (and I hope you don’t,) you will really need it.

It’s her day!

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Andy Denzler “Liquid Walking Woman” 2016 Bronze

I stroll through down-town Geneva. It is hot. Very hot. Every-language tourists swarm the luxury shrines to chocolate and watches. A stunning new bronze sculpture in Place de Longemalle stops me in my tracks. It is a young woman in hoody, cut-off denim shorts and trainers walking with confidence. She holds a smartphone. Like her living counterparts, she seems unaware of her allure or the conveniences brought by smartphone culture. She is constructed of horizontal segments re-stacked. The texture contrasts effectively with the smooth skin of the presumed model. Somehow, this sculpture captures the young woman of today. It is very beautiful and very gratifying.

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Andy Denzler “Selfie” 2016 Bronze

I look around for the plaque that names the genius behind this work. Instead, I spot the same young woman only forty metres away. She has both feet firmly planted and her smartphone held up towards her other self striding to meet her. She has that small-screen look of concentration. Is she photographing her twin, taking a selfie, recording the street scene or checking her make-up? I am captivated by these works individually and as a pair. Finding them makes my day. I wander round them admiring the poise, youth and statement that the sculptor has accomplished here. Eventually, I find a little sign that tells me these are recent works of Andy Denzler from Zurich. They are presented by and just outside the Opera Gallery.

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Andy Denzler “Selfie” 2016 Bronze (detail)

I did not grow up in the internet era nor even with a mobile phone. Denzler’s subject cannot possibly know existence without a smartphone. It is also her camera, her street map, her address book, her pen and paper, her mirror, her compass, her library, her photo album, her stereo, her shopping mall, her magazines, her cinema and much more besides. Her friends and friends’ friends, real and virtual, are connected, categorized and communicated with by Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Whatsapp and Instagram. As for all of my generation, what mobile technologies bring to humanity is both fascinating and intimidating. Were I to find myself in conversation with Denzler’s young woman, I’d be interested to know whether she could conceive of life before smartphones. And if I said something stupid like “Well, in my day, we didn’t have such technology.” I am certain she would simply look up from the screen for a second or two, look my squarely in the eye and say politely “But it’s not your day!”

Revisiting David Stacey’s Natural World

Scientific latin flows easily as painter David Stacey and I talk about frogs in his gallery-studio in Kuranda, Tropical North Queensland, Australia.

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Turning from the subject of Litoria xanthomera breeding in chlorinated swimming pools we move to view his painting of Litoria rothii. This fabulous rendering of a Northern Laughing Tree Frog clinging to a lichen covered tree with its sucker-like toe pads is simply exquisite. The identification points and character, or ‘jiz’, of this species, one that I know well and have painted myself, is captured to perfection. The fine, warty detail, camouflaging patterns and striking yellow and black ‘flash markings’ are, to me, deliciously amphibian. I want to touch it. I notice other frogs in the original works, reproductions and greetings cards around me. They all have the same effect on me.

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Orange-thighed Tree Frog – Litoria xanthomera

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Northern Laughing Tree Frog – Litoria rothii

I have written about David Stacey before. His work reveals a man deeply connected to his subjects; namely, the environments, ecologies and species of the world’s most ancient rainforests which are found only in this part of Australia. This connection seems to lead naturally, in his words, towards ‘obsession’. The sheer volume of his output since our last meeting does indeed testify to an obsession.

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Pandanus fruit segments, beetles and other matter

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Gmelina fasciculiflora

David is generous with his time. We talked about technique and style, composition and reference material. His style is unique; a ‘Stacey’ would be recognised anywhere. His latest major exhibition, featuring 70 paintings, was held at Brisbane’s prestigious Redhill Gallery during November 2016. The exhibition consisted mainly of his fine, pen and ink drawings which he then “colours in” with wonderfully opaque acrylic washes overlaid, where necessary, with thicker acrylic application. (All the works shown in this post are from the exhibition). We also discussed problems that being ‘artistic’ can bring!

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Amorbus Sp – Davies Creek

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Resting – Azure Kingfisher

However, it is David’s sense of composition that particularly impresses me. How he thinks his trademark compositions through to completion is a marvel. He balances colour, tone, form and space. He leads the eye; sometimes by not colouring or leaving something out. It is as if he considers your peripheral vision as well as your focus when composing. Clever! Some of his paintings leave me imagining what might be there that he has left out. This is the same feeling I get in the rainforest where so much is hidden in the green, luxuriant half-light.

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Rose-crowned Fruit Dove

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Emerald Dove

This compositional prowess effectively renders each painting far more than just a portrait of a species. (My own paintings, however hard I try, always end up being just that). David’s works stand alone as accomplished creations, pleasing to the eye, where the subject matter of the painting becomes simply one element among many that make up the whole.

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Peacock Spider – Maratus speciosus

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Harlequin Bug – Tectocoris diopthalmus

David has another ‘style’ which is extraordinary. He describes it as ‘surrealist’. It is these works that hold me in fascination as I explore them. They are conglomerations of images: landscapes, creatures and plants, abstract patterns and even maps. They are dream-like, thematic and thought-provoking and are woven together with his accomplished, compositional artistry.

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The sky has fallen

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Fragmentation

Our conversation was far more than just an interview for this post. I learned stuff! I also identified our shared obsessive need to portray the natural history that fills our minds with interest, respect and appreciation. We have in common those lonesome journeys and vigils in the wild places where we observe and photograph reference material and add to our knowledge and understanding of the wild. We talked of the difficulties of being obsessional ‘artists’ and how our work is profoundly personal being often difficult to market. At times, we have both ‘prostituted’ ourselves to create for a commercial market driven by conventions, expectations and desires of others. More than once David used the expression “money is corrupting”.

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Double-eyed Fig Parrot

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Zodiac Moth – Alcides metaurus

These days in Kuranda are my last in Australia. I am about to migrate back to Britain after four years of trying, unsuccessfully, to assimilate into life here. But David Stacey is where he should be. As a man so connected to the rainforests of his home he clearly understood my similar connection to the natural history of Britain and Europe. We spoke of the recognised phenomenon where an Aborigine may die if removed from his ‘country.’ In this extraordinary painter-naturalist, I found a kindred spirit who understood and acknowledged my expression, ‘homesickness is a gentle term for grief’.

Jeff Schaller: Popping Back to Switzerland

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“Lindt” Beeswax paint on wood, 61cm x 61cm

Geneva’s queen of pop, Isabelle Dunkel has enticed Jeff Schaller back to Switzerland for his seventh exhibition here. I arrive at Galerie ID as the doors open. I first spy a beautifully executed pop image comprising nods to Swiss chocolate, a black and white film that I should know the name of and a hugely successful British TV comedy series. I stroll around. This show is classy, cool and consistent. Each work is immaculately framed and hung. But the maestro is yet to arrive; the normally unflappable Ms Dunkel shows a flicker of anxiety.

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“Swiss Miss” Acrylic and screen print on wood, 28cm x 28cm.

The Schaller family roll in a few minutes after fashion o’clock. Jeff and Désirée greet me warmly. Their three young’uns are immaculately turned out for the occasion and immaculately polite.

Jeff explains his European translation of the themes he would normally pick out with his trademark encaustic (hot beeswax paint) technique. He still “takes something and adds to it.” To images of beautiful women (this time, Brigitte Bardot,) his dots and screen prints he now adds skis, snow, Fellini movies, Absolutely Fabulous and… well… Switzerland in general. I find this refreshing (and deliciously un-Swiss!) given that “Pop Art” has been so firmly drenched in JFK, Marilyn, Stars and Stripes, Harley Davison, Coca-cola etc. This transatlantic sleight of hand still recalls the pop era but the fact that it is here in Geneva now means Jeff’s work has deftly shifted from retro to contemporary and so, most probably, is in a class of its own. I love it.

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“Geneva Geneva” Acrylic and screen print on wood, 28cm x 28cm

There is also a technical transition. Bringing the exhibition from the USA has demanded some smaller pictures to which encaustic is less suited. This has pushed Jeff to experiment with heated acrylic. The results are no less accomplished.

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“Helvetica.CH” Acrylic and mixed media, 33cm x 33cm

The picture that catches my eye, causes a double-take and draws a smile is “Helvetica.CH.” This is a delightful tongue-in-cheek take on one of the world’s most commonly used typefaces, Helvetica, developed in Switzerland (of course.)

The exhibition is very satisfying; it just comes together nicely. It is unique in that it represents American “pop art” at its approachable best but nourished by Europe. The exhibition runs until the end of May. No excuses!